HomeBlogsequintanilla's blogCMS Turf Wars go Mainstream: Drupal, WordPress, Joomla, TypePad aka Entrepreneur Magazine compares Content Management Systems

CMS Turf Wars go Mainstream: Drupal, WordPress, Joomla, TypePad aka Entrepreneur Magazine compares Content Management Systems

Entrepreneur magazine is a great resource covering many topics impacting entrepreneurs. The magazine recently took a look at the current CMS Turf War. Most small business owners know that the days for a simple landing page or brochure are over. These business owners "get it" and know that they need video, Social Media, SEO, and most importantly content. They are not looking for a particular CMS but a way that makes it comfortable for them to boost search engine rankings, update a blog, add a YouTube video, and perhaps manage their e-commerce items. The CMS a business owner chooses should be easy for them to manage their site.

Entrepreneur compared the following platforms: Posterous.com, WordPress, TypePad, Drupal, Joomla, and Vignette.

Article takeaways: WordPress is better for the average user, especially if you are used to editing content in Microsoft Word or are interested primarily in putting together just a blog. When a business depends on e-commerce or creating a customer community, Drupal should be considered. The New York Observer and The White House use Drupal. The article really favors Drupal and even praises Acquia’s Drupal Gardens as a potential solution for businesses. (Acquia is the commercial entity behind the open-source Drupal CMS, and Drupal Gardens is Acquia's managed hosting service for Drupal) Entrepreneur magazine did mention Joomla as on par with Drupal but with a smaller community of plug-in and module developers.

Guidelight Business Solutions is always here to help answer your CMS questions. Also, pick up the Entrepreneur magazine and read the article.

@equintanilla


Comments

Posted On: June 7, 2010
Posted By: Anonymous

The article

What's the point of making a blog post like this without a link to the article -- which is online: http://www.entrepreneur.com/magazine/entrepreneur/2010/june/206660.html -- or even the exact title -- "The Juice Behind Your Website" -- so that those who pick up the print magazine can find it easily?

The article focuses on Wordpress versus Drupal--and it puts it pretty much as I would: If what you want is a number of static pages--which you'll probably have your developer set up initially--and a single blog for your business--go with Wordpress. It is a great tool for blogging. If you want something more--if you want different types of content pages, say, product pages with sections for specifications, a descriptions, your own reviews and user reviews, or an updatable menu, an integrated events calendar--go with Drupal. But go with a developer who can explain the system to you at your technical level from the start and include a couple hours of training for you and the staff who will be using the system into the bid.

Drupal isn't hard to use--and is getting easier with each new release--but a few things aren't intuitive. A good developer can help put your most frequent tasks up front for you and make you confident with just a little time showing you around the dashboard.

The library in my village is having a new Drupal website built--and it's exactly the right tool for them--it will allow interactivity and more functionality at a very affordable price. And the White House developers released some free plugins for section 508 compatibility that make it a natural for state and local governments and anyone interested in serving differently-abled users.

Joomla can go from zero to functioning website a little quicker than Drupal--largely because there are a lot more really nice free or cheap visual themes that you can plug in and go with with just minor tweaking--but the architecture is a little more limited than Drupal's.

--Steve Maxey
Maxey Mediaworks http://www.maxeymediaworks.com

Posted On: June 7, 2010
Posted By: admin

Thank you.

I apologize for making it difficult for you to find the article. My thoughts were to right the post to encourage blog readers to go the store and actually read the article. So, I was attributing the magazine and not the article.

Next time, I will be clearer so that all blog readers will have an easier time finding the referenced article.

- Elizabeth Quintanilla or @equintanilla

Posted On: June 4, 2010
Posted By: Anonymous

Exactly on point

I have been working with Joomla for years and now WordPress and have done database applications and database backed websites for years/decades.

It is important to know the differences between the platforms, but the most important thing is for the client to be comfortable and trained in a platform they will use otherwise all the effort and cost go for nothing. Also, hosted vs. owned doesn't matter as much as whether the keys will be handed to the client/end user or not. I have seen too many site, static or DB backed, where the developer kept all the relationships with the hosting company and all the passwords (in order to get $50 to $100 an hour for simple content updates) and after six months or a year the developer gets a full time job or disappears and the client is left with an unusable or failed site for lack of responsiveness.

Bottom line, as in most technology issues, the technology problems and challenges are not nearly as difficult or costly as the human/people problems. If you can really identify the business and people issues and solve those you will be successful.

austxjr

Posted On: June 4, 2010
Posted By: Anonymous

Exactly on point

I have been working with Joomla for years and now WordPress and have done database applications and database backed websites for years/decades.

It is important to know the differences between the platforms, but the most important thing is for the client to be comfortable and trained in a platform they will use otherwise all the effort and cost go for nothing. Also, hosted vs. owned doesn't matter as much as whether the keys will be handed to the client/end user or not. I have seen too many site, static or DB backed, where the developer kept all the relationships with the hosting company and all the passwords (in order to get $50 to $100 an hour for simple content updates) and after six months or a year the developer gets a full time job or disappears and the client is left with an unusable or failed site for lack of responsiveness.

Bottom line, as in most technology issues, the technology problems and challenges are not nearly as difficult or costly as the human/people problems. If you can really identify the business and people issues and solve those you will be successful.

austxjr

Posted On: June 3, 2010
Posted By: Anonymous

apples and oranges of CMS

I didn't read the article, but your summary and takeaway makes it look like it may have compared apples and oranges: The only thing common to all is the blogging aspect, which, afaik, is _all_ Posterous is. I could be wrong.

I do, however, appreciate that WordPress (assumed: as a hosted solution) was pitted against Drupal Gardens (a hosted solution). I also appreciate that Drupal is up on top-- so powerful, so flexible.. if not a bit of a learning curve or expensive venture to get it the way you like it.


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